Women’s Survival Tactics, ‘Vex Money’ and Generational Inheritance, in Ayobami Adebayo’s “A Spell Of Good Things”

Written by Mide Olabanji

Edited by Ruby Fatimilehin

Illustrated by Grace Kaluba

It is not uncommon to hear another assert that social media is not real life, especially as a retort during feminist discourses in Nigeria. Although many of us are introduced to feminist thoughts —like women’s access to education and precautions against male violence—from our caregivers, women who proudly wear the feminist tag remain a minority. Thanks to social media, however, a borderless community of feminists is alive and thriving, connecting Nigerian women of different classes, religions, ethnicities, and even time zones. It was “Feminist Twitter,” as the subsection is commonly called, that equipped me with the name for the abstract concept of vex money and explained the nuances surrounding wives’ secret stashes of money to me. 

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‘Queer Women Are Behaving Badly’ with Ayodele Olofintuade

Written by Inioluwa Ayanlowo

Edited by Veronica Vivi

Illustrated by Maïa Walcott 

Even in this day and age, the ideal Nigerian woman is a woman who is reserved, soft-spoken, and uninformed. She has made it her mission to remain calm and attractive to men, as she desires a successful marriage. While it can be tiring to constantly strive to satisfy the fragile male ego, she does not wish to be labeled as difficult: she has become so accustomed to being scrutinized for every detail of her persona that she simply wants to be accepted and does not wish to have to face life alone.

Add queerness into the mix and she will be condemned to always be in the background. After being constantly served homophobia with a side order of sexism, the Nigerian woman is content to just hide away and lead a life in the shadows. Ayodele Olofintuade taught me that sometimes you can dutifully follow society’s dictates and it still will not be enough to be accepted by it. So, as I was introduced to the Lakiriboto Chronicles at Ayodele Olofintuade’s 2021 Christmas Party, I understood the appeal of being a badly behaved woman. You can virtually be a mannequin and society will still find faults in you, so why not be badly behaved?

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The subversion and empowerment of Léopold Sédar Senghor’s “Black Woman”

Written by Hope Olagoke 

Edited by Veronica Vivi

Illustrated by Sâde Popoola @shadz_art

Poetry (either reading or writing it) had always been a form of artistic expression I tried to evade – a habit I picked up from secondary school as I found poems often ambiguous. My swift decision to major in English and literary studies in university lacked a reminder that I would have to deal with poems throughout my degree. A course I took in my junior year of university introduced me to Négritude, a cultural and literary movement that laid importance on embracing African heritage and identity. Therein, Léopold Sédar Senghor’s “Black Woman” was recommended as a Négritude poem written by one of the reputable figures, who pioneered this significant cultural movement. Thus, I discovered the masterpiece that would not only ignite my love for poetry, but also awaken my sense of self as African and, above all, as a Black Woman. 

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‘On Black Sisters Street’ Showcases the Nuances of Sexual Trafficking

Written by Precious Uzoma-Nwosu

Edited by Veronica Vivi

Illustrated by Noella Abba

https://open.spotify.com/episode/6YgNVArJnwZ7xjO81KoUIG?si=e23a5271a0544ca7


While growing up, there were rules set by my father that were never to be compromised on, and among them was not spending holidays with another family aside from our own. I was greatly disturbed by this boundary, as my friends often share tales of their visits to their relatives’ houses after the school breaks. As I became wiser, I realized that my father felt his children would be safe from sexual exploitation, including sexual trafficking, if we stayed within his watch. Therefore, it was home, school (although boarding), church, and places that were supervised by him or my mother – he did not want to leave any loopholes.

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Second Class Citizen by Buchi Emecheta

Elizabeth Lawal

Edited by Muireann Crowley

Art by Zoë Guthrie http://zoeguthrie.com/

Second Class Citizen (1976) by Buchi Emecheta is set in Lagos, Nigeria during World War II, and is about a woman called Adah and her marriage to Francis. Although life initially seems rosy for Adah, things turn sour when it becomes clear that Francis is physically and emotionally abusive.

When I was in high school I came across this book by chance; it was in a box full of books the teachers said we could take for free. The main reason I picked the book was because I noticed that the writer was Nigerian and of Igbo descent. Later on, I gave a presentation on it because there were no books by a black woman on our English Literature syllabus. After the presentation I asked if the book could be added and although the teacher was encouraging, my classmates were not. I think it was quite different to what they were used to – most of my classmates were white British. I vividly remember an Irish girl shouting from her desk, “I don’t want to learn about Africa.” I was a confrontational child, so I asked, “Why?’’ And she hit me with: “I just don’t.” I remember being so disappointed, and saying, “Well, I don’t want to learn about James I or Shakespeare and the Industrial Revolution, but you don’t hear me complaining.” This was met with silence.

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The Whispering Trees by Abubaker Adam Ibrahim

Joycelyn Longdon

Edited by Veronica Vivi

Art by Jazmine Sheckleford www.facebook.com/jasmineillustrations13

Abubaker Adam Ibrahim’s short story, ‘The Whispering Trees’, follows the spiritual awakening of protagonist Salim, a Nigerian medical student, after being rendered blind from a fatal car accident. Shortlisted for the 2013 Caine Prize for African Writing, this story stood out to me, with its ability to pair emotional familiarity with cultural insight and authenticity, raising personal questions on the compatibility or incompatibility of spirituality and religion. Seldom approached in Theology or Philosophy courses, the defeat of spirituality by religion and the ongoing practices of spirituality within the African community are subjects in need of more academic scrutiny.

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