Women’s Survival Tactics, ‘Vex Money’ and Generational Inheritance, in Ayobami Adebayo’s “A Spell Of Good Things”

Written by Mide Olabanji

Edited by Ruby Fatimilehin

Illustrated by Grace Kaluba

It is not uncommon to hear another assert that social media is not real life, especially as a retort during feminist discourses in Nigeria. Although many of us are introduced to feminist thoughts —like women’s access to education and precautions against male violence—from our caregivers, women who proudly wear the feminist tag remain a minority. Thanks to social media, however, a borderless community of feminists is alive and thriving, connecting Nigerian women of different classes, religions, ethnicities, and even time zones. It was “Feminist Twitter,” as the subsection is commonly called, that equipped me with the name for the abstract concept of vex money and explained the nuances surrounding wives’ secret stashes of money to me. 

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‘On Black Sisters Street’ Showcases the Nuances of Sexual Trafficking

Written by Precious Uzoma-Nwosu

Edited by Veronica Vivi

Illustrated by Noella Abba

https://open.spotify.com/episode/6YgNVArJnwZ7xjO81KoUIG?si=e23a5271a0544ca7


While growing up, there were rules set by my father that were never to be compromised on, and among them was not spending holidays with another family aside from our own. I was greatly disturbed by this boundary, as my friends often share tales of their visits to their relatives’ houses after the school breaks. As I became wiser, I realized that my father felt his children would be safe from sexual exploitation, including sexual trafficking, if we stayed within his watch. Therefore, it was home, school (although boarding), church, and places that were supervised by him or my mother – he did not want to leave any loopholes.

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I May Destroy You, Atlanta and Get Out: Afro-Surrealism and the everyday horror of Blackness

Written by Laura Hackshaw

Edited by Veronica Vivi

Illustrated by Daley North

This is a show tune
But the show hasn’t been written for it, yet

Hound dogs on my trail
School children sitting in jail

Black cat cross my path
I think every day’s gonna be my last

Lord have mercy on this land of mine
We all gonna get it in due time
I don’t belong here
I don’t belong there
I’ve even stopped believing in prayer

–  Mississippi Goddamn by Nina Simone

‘‘Afro-Surrealism is drifting into contemporary culture on a rowboat with no oars…to hunt down clues for the cure.’’

–  D. Scot Miller – Afrosurreal Manifesto: Black is the New Black a 21st Century Manifesto (2009)

*This essay contains spoiler alerts for several TV shows and films

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Her Nuclear Waters: An Appeal to Transcendence in Diaspora Art

Written by Mekhala Dave

Edited by Hannah McGurk and Ketaki Zodgekar

Illustrated by Jahnavi Zondervan

As a result of this globalised world, in the echo of the text from the Her Nuclear Waters comic by Chitra Ganesh, ‘tattoo her onto this city’s skin, stroke by stroke by stroke’, I moved into and away from borders. Borders, at once as the physicality of territories of nations, and as cultural, psychological and linguistic divides; as sites of violence and militarisation.

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