‘Queer Women Are Behaving Badly’ with Ayodele Olofintuade

Written by Inioluwa Ayanlowo

Edited by Veronica Vivi

Illustrated by Maïa Walcott 

Even in this day and age, the ideal Nigerian woman is a woman who is reserved, soft-spoken, and uninformed. She has made it her mission to remain calm and attractive to men, as she desires a successful marriage. While it can be tiring to constantly strive to satisfy the fragile male ego, she does not wish to be labeled as difficult: she has become so accustomed to being scrutinized for every detail of her persona that she simply wants to be accepted and does not wish to have to face life alone.

Add queerness into the mix and she will be condemned to always be in the background. After being constantly served homophobia with a side order of sexism, the Nigerian woman is content to just hide away and lead a life in the shadows. Ayodele Olofintuade taught me that sometimes you can dutifully follow society’s dictates and it still will not be enough to be accepted by it. So, as I was introduced to the Lakiriboto Chronicles at Ayodele Olofintuade’s 2021 Christmas Party, I understood the appeal of being a badly behaved woman. You can virtually be a mannequin and society will still find faults in you, so why not be badly behaved?

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Centring Pleasure Activism with adrienne maree brown

Written by Amuna Wagner

Edited by Veronica Vivi

Illustrated by Olamide Florence Adeoye aka Sharp Txngue

“How do we make social justice the most pleasurable human experience?” (back cover) asks adrienne maree brown in her phenomenal book Pleasure Activism: The Politics of Feeling Good (2019). Guided by its opening chapter, Audre Lorde’s “Uses of the Erotic: Erotic As Power” (27-37), the anthology explores a world that centres pleasure and care for ourselves and others. The book doubles as a collection of radical theories and a study guide of hands-on practice. I was living in Cairo in 2021 when I stumbled across a class on pleasurable feminisms; a group of people gathered weekly to intimately study the book, intrigued by brown’s question: “How can we awaken within ourselves desires that make it impossible to settle for anything less than a fulfilling life?” (back cover). Over the course of three months, Pleasure Activism: The Politics of Feeling Good reordered my world view and became my road map on how to live a consciously political life without guilt.

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A UTOPIAN CURRICULUM PART FIVE: SUPERMAN

Written by Ibtisam Ahmed

Edited by Maria Elena Carpintero Torres-Quevedo

Illustration by Iara Silva

Before I delve into this part of the Utopian Curriculum series, I must offer some thanks. First and foremost, to the incredible team at Project Myopia for their patience and compassion for me as an individual. The past several years have been difficult for so many of us and it is encouraging to see a publication actually embody the ethos of care and utopianism that we collectively agreed to explore when this series was first pitched. It is rare and makes all the difference. Second, specifically to Maria Elena Carpintero Torres-Quevodo for your feedback and nurturing editing. It has been a real joy being asked to delve deeper into my thoughts in a way that was constructive and empowering. Third, to Iara Silva for your incredible artwork. Arresting visual media is a wonderful way to express complex thoughts – all the more relevant for this particular essay given the graphic nature of the source material.

And finally, to you dear reader, for sticking with this endeavour. It feels serendipitous offering my gratitude halfway through this curriculum, especially as so much has changed since it was first pitched. Part of this change is the actual source material itself. When I first included Superman as an example of utopia, it was a more generic take on the character and his history. But Superman has evolved since then and it is the specific take on his latest iteration – an openly queer child of a refugee with intentionally inclusive politics – that I will be exploring here.

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