‘Queer Women Are Behaving Badly’ with Ayodele Olofintuade

Written by Inioluwa Ayanlowo

Edited by Veronica Vivi

Illustrated by Maïa Walcott 

Even in this day and age, the ideal Nigerian woman is a woman who is reserved, soft-spoken, and uninformed. She has made it her mission to remain calm and attractive to men, as she desires a successful marriage. While it can be tiring to constantly strive to satisfy the fragile male ego, she does not wish to be labeled as difficult: she has become so accustomed to being scrutinized for every detail of her persona that she simply wants to be accepted and does not wish to have to face life alone.

Add queerness into the mix and she will be condemned to always be in the background. After being constantly served homophobia with a side order of sexism, the Nigerian woman is content to just hide away and lead a life in the shadows. Ayodele Olofintuade taught me that sometimes you can dutifully follow society’s dictates and it still will not be enough to be accepted by it. So, as I was introduced to the Lakiriboto Chronicles at Ayodele Olofintuade’s 2021 Christmas Party, I understood the appeal of being a badly behaved woman. You can virtually be a mannequin and society will still find faults in you, so why not be badly behaved?

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Octavia Butler is in Defence of Failure: Kindred’s Black Grief as a New Dawn

Written by Alma Simba

Edited by Katya Zabelski

Illustrated by Sage Anifowoshe

I come to Dana through Saidiya. And Saidiya comes to Dana in relation to Venus. We all convene under a sky of grief particular to black women. Of the crushing weight of history. I pick up from where Saidiya leaves off. The archive, the futility, the resignation to language and history never being enough. Of failure as the new sky. But maybe also the new dawn.

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I come across Kindred by Octavia Butler in a reference by Saidiya Hartman’s 2008 article, “Venus in Two Acts.”  In the article, Hartman explores how the history of domination must be accepted by black people to try and untangle it. The article functions as a continuation of her earlier book, Lose Your Mother, where she charts the journey of the middle passage, loss, and connection to history. In “Venus in Two Acts,” Hartman continues this historical reconstruction and methodological struggle when she writes of a young girl who was murdered on a slave ship with little further information cited in the records. In both, Hartman highlights the difficulty in deciphering the blankness and violence in black historical narratives, while discussing the different options in the weighted obstacle of writing black history. 

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